Craig Deihl

Executive Chef
(pictured left)

Born & raised in Danville, Penn., Chef Craig Deihl grew up in a quintessential American household, where every evening dinner was on the table by the time his father was home from work. His mother, an “unbelievable” cook, graced the family’s table with homespun meals—a ritual which remains to be one of the biggest influences he has had as a chef.

Deihl is a   Deihl was chosen in 2010 as Chef of the Year by the Charleston chapter of the American Culinary Foundation. That same year, he was a semi-finalist for a prestigious James Beard Foundation award for best chef Southeast, and was a nominee for the award in 2011 and 2012, as well as a semi-finalist again in 2013. Since 2011, he has led Slow Food Charleston’s Chefs-in-Schools program, which places local chefs in schools and educates students on healthy food choices through classroom demonstrations, after-school programs, tastings and professional development.

Through a partnership with the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy (ALBC) and farmer Gra Moore of Carolina Heritage Farm, Deihl had the opportunity to be the first chef in over 100 years to utilize the rare American Guinea Hog. This same passion for preserving meat prompted him to adopt the CSA-like concept for meats, Artisan Meat Share (AMS). From 2009-2013, participants received local charcuterie and local farmers, in turn, received support from the increased product demand in what Deihl describes as a win-win scenario for both. In late summer 2014, Artisan Meat Share is opening at 33 Spring St., providing a place where guests can enjoy all that AMS has to offer—all the time—including award-winning charcuterie, freshly butchered meat and delicious sandwiches.

To date, Deihl has produced over 90 types of charcuterie which have been prepared, stored and cured in-house at Cypress.

Bob Cook

Chef de Cuisine
(pictured right)

Bob started at Little Traverse Bay Golf Club in Harbor Springs, MI at 14, and quickly realized that he wanted to pursue a career in the kitchen. He committed himself to working his way up in the culinary world and became sous chef at the Club by the end of high school. With limited instruction and a great deal of trial and error, Cook has enjoyed 17 successful years in the industry.

Over his career, Cook has become proficient in the behind-the-scenes aspects of a restaurant. His passion lies in South Asian, Korean and Thai cuisines and he has a self-professed love for anything fermented and bubbly (i.e., kimchi, sauerkraut, and pickling/preservation methods).

Cook moved from Michigan to Charleston in 2007 to join the team at Cypress where he has showcased his strong butchering skills and worked hand-in-hand with executive chef Craig Deihl in developing the charcuterie program. He has also developed many in-house bread recipes and his kimchi was recognized in Garden & Gun in March 2012.

Craig Deihl

Executive Chef
(pictured left)

Born & raised in Danville, Penn., Chef Craig Deihl grew up in a quintessential American household, where every evening dinner was on the table by the time his father was home from work. His mother, an “unbelievable” cook, graced the family’s table with homespun meals—a ritual which remains to be one of the biggest influences he has had as a chef.

Deihl is a   Deihl was chosen in 2010 as Chef of the Year by the Charleston chapter of the American Culinary Foundation. That same year, he was a semi-finalist for a prestigious James Beard Foundation award for best chef Southeast, and was a nominee for the award in 2011 and 2012, as well as a semi-finalist again in 2013. Since 2011, he has led Slow Food Charleston’s Chefs-in-Schools program, which places local chefs in schools and educates students on healthy food choices through classroom demonstrations, after-school programs, tastings and professional development.

Through a partnership with the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy (ALBC) and farmer Gra Moore of Carolina Heritage Farm, Deihl had the opportunity to be the first chef in over 100 years to utilize the rare American Guinea Hog. This same passion for preserving meat prompted him to adopt the CSA-like concept for meats, Artisan Meat Share (AMS). From 2009-2013, participants received local charcuterie and local farmers, in turn, received support from the increased product demand in what Deihl describes as a win-win scenario for both. In late summer 2014, Artisan Meat Share is opening at 33 Spring St., providing a place where guests can enjoy all that AMS has to offer—all the time—including award-winning charcuterie, freshly butchered meat and delicious sandwiches.

To date, Deihl has produced over 90 types of charcuterie which have been prepared, stored and cured in-house at Cypress.




Bob Cook

Chef de Cuisine
(pictured right)

Bob started at Little Traverse Bay Golf Club in Harbor Springs, MI at 14, and quickly realized that he wanted to pursue a career in the kitchen. He committed himself to working his way up in the culinary world and became sous chef at the Club by the end of high school. With limited instruction and a great deal of trial and error, Cook has enjoyed 17 successful years in the industry.

Over his career, Cook has become proficient in the behind-the-scenes aspects of a restaurant. His passion lies in South Asian, Korean and Thai cuisines and he has a self-professed love for anything fermented and bubbly (i.e., kimchi, sauerkraut, and pickling/preservation methods).

Cook moved from Michigan to Charleston in 2007 to join the team at Cypress where he has showcased his strong butchering skills and worked hand-in-hand with executive chef Craig Deihl in developing the charcuterie program. He has also developed many in-house bread recipes and his kimchi was recognized in Garden & Gun in March 2012.




 
167 EAST BAY STREET * CHARLESTON, SC 29401 | 843.727.0111